© 2019 Andy Hong All Rights Reserved.

Publications

Highlights

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Hong, Andy, Byoungjun Kim, and Michael Widener. 2019. Noise and the City: Leveraging crowdsourced big data to examine the spatio-temporal relationship between urban development and noise annoyance. Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science. (doi: 10.1177/2399808318821112) – Impact Factor: 2.046

This study examined the relationship between construction activities and noise annoyance and tested whether this relationship is stronger after working hours. Data were drawn from a historical inventory of major development projects and 2 million records of crowdsourced citizen complaints data (311 calls) in Vancouver, Canada from 2011 to 2016. Results show that neighborhood noise complaints were significantly associated with major constructions. A significant interaction effect was also found between construction activities and after-hours reporting. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to empirically show the adverse effects of urban development on noise annoyance. The results imply that existing noise bylaws may not be effective in restricting construction activities at night and during sleeping hours, which may cause adverse health effects.

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Hong, Andy. 2019. Effect of mode shift from car to light rail on personal exposure: A controlled experiment. Atmospheric Environment, 196: 53-65 (doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.10.004) – Impact Factor: 3.63

This paper investigates to what extent mode shift from car to LRT can reduce personal exposure to PM2.5, BC, and UFP. Simultaneous measurements on LRT and automobile were conducted under four plausible commuting scenarios in Los Angeles, California from October to November in 2014. The results indicate that modal difference in commuter exposure between car and LRT is, in large part, driven by ventilation status and travel microenvironments. Other factors, such as roadway type, vehicle fan strength, vehicle speed, and vehicle age, are likely to influence the modal difference in a more subtle way. Results inform future research and policy about the importance of incorporating ventilation and traffic microenvironments for assessing the health effects of a mode switch from car to LRT.

New light rail transit and active travel: A longitudinal study

Hong, Andy, Sallis, James F., King, Abby C., Conway, Terry, Saelens, Brian, Cain, Kelli, Fox, Eric, Frank, Lawrence. 2018. Linking green space to neighborhood social capital in older adults: The role of perceived safety. Social Science & Medicine, 207: 38-45 (doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.04.051) – Impact Factor: 2.81

This study examines the moderating effect of perceived safety on the association of green space with neighborhood social capital in older adults. Data were drawn from 647 independent-living seniors who participated in the Senior Neighborhood Quality of Life Study in the Seattle/King County and Baltimore/Washington DC region. The results suggest that certain green space elements, such as natural sights, may be beneficial to neighborhood social capital of older adults. However, other types of green space, such as parks and street trees, may be less advantageous to older adults who perceive their neighborhoods as unsafe for pedestrians. Findings highlight the importance of pedestrian safety in examining associations of green space with neighborhood social capital in older adults.

New light rail transit and active travel: A longitudinal study

Hong, Andy, Boarnet, Marlon G., Houston, Douglas. 2016. New light rail transit and active travel: A longitudinal study. Transportation Research Part A, 92: 131-144 (doi: 10.1016/j.tra.2016.07.005) – Impact Factor: 2.99 (Most downloaded articles in the last 90 days: 1/2017 - 5/2017)

This study investigates the before-and-after impact of a new light rail transit line on active travel behavior. Using panel data, we found that living within a half-mile of a transit station was associated with an increase in walking and physical activity for participants who previously had low walking and physical activity levels. The results were opposite for participants with previously high walking and physical activity levels. Future policy and research should consider the possibility that sedentary populations may be more responsive to new transit investments, and more targeted “soft” approaches in transit service would be needed to encourage people to make healthy travel choices.

The role of destination's built environment on nonmotorized travel behavior: A case of Long Beach, California

Kim, Dohyung, Park, JiYoung, Hong, Andy. 2017. The role of destination's built environment on nonmotorized travel behavior: A case of Long Beach, California. Journal of Planning Education and Research (doi: 10.1177/0739456X16688765) – Impact Factor: 1.38

This study examines how built environment factors at trip destinations influence nonmotorized travel behavior in the City of Long Beach, California. Using 2008–2009 National Household Travel Survey with California Add-Ons, we found that nonmotorized users tend to choose more clustered destinations than motorized users, and that density, diversity, and design at destinations significantly affect mode choice decisions. Transportation networks and nonmotorized facilities at trip destinations are especially important factors for nonmotorized mode choice. Future policy and research need to consider built environment factors at trip destinations to effectively accommodate nonmotorized travel within a city.

Impact of temporary freeway closure on regional air quality: A lesson from Carmageddon in Los Angeles, United States

Hong, Andy, Schweitzer, Lisa, Marr, Lindsey, Yang, Wan. 2015. Impact of temporary freeway closure on regional air quality: A lesson from Carmageddon in Los Angeles, United States. Environmental Science and Technology, 49(5): 3211–3218 (doi: 10.1021/es505185c) – Impact Factor: 6.2

This study examines the impact of a two-day freeway closure on traffic and several criteria air pollutants (CO, NO2, O3, PM10, PM2.5). Using regional traffic and ambient air quality data from Southern California, we found that regional traffic decreased about 14% on average during the closure. Daily average PM2.5 levels decreased by about 32%, and daily 8 h maximum ozone levels decreased by about 16%. However, the daily 1 h maximum NO2 concentration was higher at some sites during the closure. Despite the mixed results with NO2, this study provides empirical evidence to support traffic reduction as an effective strategy to address chronic air pollution problems, especially with regard to ozone, in Southern California.

Peer-Reviewed JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Hong, Andy, Byoungjun Kim, and Michael Widener (2019) Noise and the City: Leveraging crowdsourced big data to examine the spatio-temporal relationship between urban development and noise annoyance. Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science. (doi: 10.1177/2399808318821112) – Impact Factor: 2.046
     

  2. Frank, Lawrence D., Mayaud, Jerome, Hong, Andy, Fisher, Pat, Kershaw, Suzanne (2019) Unmet demand for walkable neighborhoods in a mid-sized Canadian community: Implications for planning. Journal of Planning Education and Research. (doi: 10.1177/0739456X19831064) – Impact Factor: 2.328
     

  3. Frank, Lawrence D., Hong, Andy, and Ngo, Victor D (2019) Causal evaluation of urban greenway retrofit: A longitudinal study on physical activity and sedentary behavior. Preventive Medicine. (doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.01.011) – Impact Factor: 3.434
     

  4. Frank, Lawrence D, Iroz-Elardo, Nicole, MacLeod, Kara E., and Hong, Andy (2019). Pathways from built environment to health: A conceptual framework linking behavior and exposure-based impacts. Journal of Transport & Health. (doi: 10.1016/j.jth.2018.11.008) – Impact Factor: 2.774
     

  5. Hong, Andy. (2019). Effect of mode shift from car to light rail on personal exposure: A controlled experiment. Atmospheric Environment, 196: 53-65. (doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.10.004) – Impact Factor: 3.63
     

  6. Hong, Andy, Sallis, James F., King, Abby C., Conway, Terry, Saelens, Brian, Cain, Kelli, Fox, Eric, Frank, Lawrence. (2018). Linking green space to neighborhood social capital in older adults: The role of perceived safety. Social Science & Medicine, 207: 38-45. (doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.04.051) – Impact Factor: 2.81
     

  7. Boarnet, Marlon G, Hong, Andy, Santiago-Bartolomei, Raul. (2017). Urban spatial structure, employment subcenters, and freight travel.  Journal of Transport Geography, 60: 267-276. (doi: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2017.03.007)  – Impact Factor: 2.93
     

  8. Kim, Dohyung, Park, JiYoung, Hong, Andy. (2017). The role of destination's built environment on nonmotorized travel behavior: A case of Long Beach, California. Journal of Planning Education and Research. (doi: 10.1177/0739456X16688765) – Impact Factor: 1.38
     

  9. Hong, Andy, Boarnet, Marlon G., Houston, Douglas. (2016). New light rail transit and active travel: A longitudinal study. Transportation Research Part A, 92: 131-144. (doi: 10.1016/j.tra.2016.07.005) – Impact Factor: 2.99 (Most downloaded articles in the last 90 days: 1/2017 - 5/2017)
     

  10. Hong, Andy, Schweitzer, Lisa, Marr, Lindsey, Yang, Wan. (2015). Impact of temporary freeway closure on regional air quality: A lesson from Carmageddon in Los Angeles, United States. Environmental Science and Technology, 49(5): 3211–3218. (doi: 10.1021/es505185c) – Impact Factor: 6.2
     

  11. Hong, Andy. 2014. Do attitudes moderate the built environment impact on bicycle commuting? Findings from the 2009 National Household Travel Survey of the United States. Korean Local Administration Review, 11(2): 155-172.
     

  12. Hong, E. Andy and Bae, C.-H Christine. (2012). Exposure of bicyclists to air pollution in Seattle, Washington: Hybrid analysis using personal monitoring and land use regression. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2270: 59-66. (doi: 10.3141/2270-08) – Impact Factor: 0.77

BOOK CHAPTERS

  1. Jani, Anant and Hong, Andy (forthcoming) Urban Transitions, Green Infrastructure and Planetary Health. Economics of Planetary Health. The Rockefeller Foundation Planetary Health Economic Council. Oxford, UK.
     

  2. Hong, Andy (2018) Environmental Benefits of Active Transportation. In Richard Larouche (Ed.), Children’s Active Transportation. Cambridge, UK: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-811931-0.00002-8

Op-ed/media contribution

  1. Hong, Andy. (2019) What can London learn from car-free cities around the world? Thomson Reuters Foundation News. http://news.trust.org/item/20190920100921-ou5qd

Manuscripts under Review

  1. Adhikari, Binay, Hong, Andy, and Frank, Lawrence D. (under review) Understanding travel behavior through changes in urban form, preference, and life events: A longitudinal study. Research in Transportation Business and Management.
     

  2. Frank, Lawrence D., Bigazzi, Alex, Hong, Andy, Minaker, Leia, Fisher, Pat, Raine, Kim. (under review) Built environment influences on healthy eating and active living: A “newpath” to energy balance. Health and Place.
     

  3. Jia, Peng and Hong, Andy. (under review) Association between traffic-related environmental factors and childhood obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews.

Invited manuscripts for A SPEcial issue

  1. Hong, A, Baker, L, Prieto, R, Buswala, B, Guan, C, Ravindranath, D, Duminy, J. (submitted) Reconciling the gap between big data and thick data to advance the ‘new’ urban sciences. Invited manuscript for a special issue on big data and urban planning in Cities.
     

  2. Hong, A, Patino, J, Smit, W, Mayavel, D, Balakrishnan, K, Mandal, S, Bhor, N. Spatial disparities in greenspace access over the long-term in emerging cities of the global South. (full manuscript scheduled for submission by Jan. 21, 2020 for the Trees, People, and the Built Environment Conference).

Working Papers

  1. Hong, A, Cole, S, Jani, A, Fairhurst, R, Kearsley, A, Gidlow, C. Crowdsourcing for citizen participation in smart cities (scheduled for submission to Environment and Planning B in Fall 2019).
     

  2. Frank, Lawrence D., Hong, Andy, and Ngo, Victor D. Uptake of cycling after a new urban greenway: A longitudinal study (scheduled for submission to Transportation Research Part A in Winter 2019).
     

  3. Hong, Andy and Frank, Lawrence D. Causal impact of transit on health: A conceptual framework, brief review, and research agenda (scheduled for submission to International Journal of Public Health in Winter 2019).
     

  4. Kang, Jae-Won, Hong Andy, Sung, Hyungun. Identifying the Moderating Impacts of Daily Use of ICTs between Quality of Life and Residential Walkability in Seoul (scheduled for submission to Journal of Urban Health in Winter 2019).
     

  5. Devries D, Iroz-Elardo N, Hong A, Winters M, Brauer M, Frank LD. The health effects of fixed-guideway transit investment: A review of methods and best practice (scheduled for submission to BMC Public Health in Winter 2019).
     

  6. Hong, Andy, Kang, Hyewon, and Kim, Rosa. Urban-rural differences in cognitive impairment among Korean older adults: A longitudinal cohort study (scheduled for submission to Journal of Aging and Health in Winter 2019).
     

  7. Hong, Andy, Fruin, Scott, and Ratnam, Suresh. Effect of open streets events in Los Angeles on local air quality (scheduled for submission to Science of the Total Environment in Winter 2019).
     

  8. Rossa-Roccor, V., Acheson, E., Andrade-Rivas, F., Coombe, M.; Ogura, S., Super, L., Hong, A. Mission accomplished? A scoping review and bibliometric analysis of the term ‘Planetary Health’ in the peer-reviewed literature. (scheduled for submission to Lancet Planetary Health in Spring 2020).
     

  9. Frank, Lawrence D., Hong, Andy, Adhikari, Binay, Sandhu, Jat, Demlow, Ellen, Hu, Yumian. Neighborhood walkability and diabetes: A path analysis of 28,000 samples from the My Health, My Community study (scheduled for submission to Health and Place in Spring 2020).

Research Reports

  1. Hong, Andy. CitySensor: Development and pilot testing of urban environmental sensor using open-source hardware and software. Final report to the USC Graduate School, 2016.
     

  2. Hong, Andy, and Boarnet, Marlon, The Expo Light Rail Line: A context to examine how the urban environment is associated with physical activity. USC Lusk Center for Real Estate, 2013.
     

  3. Bae, C.-H Christine, Hong, Andy, Developing a methodology to measure and analyze bicyclist exposure to black carbon emissions: A pilot study. The Korea Transport Institute, Ilsan, Korea, 2011.
     

  4. Ginger, Noa, Hong, Andy, Murphy, John, Rose, Danielle, Schmiedeskamp, Peter, Snypp, Amanda, Torikai, Eiji, Bicycling planning, best practices, and count methodology. Puget Sound Regional Council, Seattle, 2010.
     

  5. Benson, Diana, Brey, Greg, Hong, Andy, Snypp, Amanda, Shoreline southeast subarea implementation strategy: Shoreline bicycle wayfinding. Northwest Center for Livable Communities, University of Washington, Seattle, 2010.
     

  6. Hong, Andy, Green transportation: the role of grassroots organizations in Seattle. In C.-H Christine Bae and Dana Spindler (eds.), Green growth: The case of Seattle. Korea Research Institute for Human Settlement, Seoul, 2010.